Entries Tagged as 'B2B marketing'

Direct Marketing Tips: How To Cut Costs And Get Better Response

I’ve been asked, “How can I cut costs and find a more practical way to get my target market to respond to my direct marketing?”

First, determine who your best customers are, then target direct marketing efforts at companies  and contacts who are similar.

Rank current customers by three criteria:

* How much revenue they represent
* How profitable each customer is
* How well their needs “fit” what you have to offer

Then look for similarities among the unique attributes of these top customers:

* What industries are they in?
* What is similar about how they use your products?
* Are they large, medium or small?
* Where are they located?
* Who are the key decision-makers and what are their titles?

You can also purchase some outside lists of companies and contacts that match and add them to your direct marketing campaigns, but be careful about being considered a spammer!

Focus your marketing with these direct marketing strategies and you’ll improve the overall quality of your campaigns.

Link to a more detailed article on the subject: Focus your direct marketing

 

Promote People Who Are Cooperative Team Members

B2B marketingThere are big rewards when sales and marketing are effectively integrated–not least of which are improved operating performance and outstanding financial results.

Promote people who are cooperative team members

Some might say that sales and marketing “personalities” are two very different animals. They think differently and act differently and approach the same customers with very different points of view. Added to that is the unspoken habit they each have of “looking down” on one another.

One way to integrate these cultures is to have the marketing department and sales people both report to the same department head. Simply by spending time near people, with joint department meetings and problem solving teams, helps to break down barriers that no technology band-aid could achieve. And then promote those who are cooperative team members. It shows that cooperation is valued, and those values will become part of the new culture.

 

 

B2b Online Marketing Tip: Does Your Website Make it Immediately Clear What Your Company Does and Who it Serves?

Take a fresh look at your company’s website. Does your Web site make it immediately clear what your company does and who it serves?

Does it clearly spell out:

  • The products or services your company sells?
  • The most common applications for your products or services?
  • The types of businesses or institutions you serve? business? education? government?
  • The size of organizations your company serves? large? medium? small?
  • The geographies you serve? local areas? states? countries? regions of the world?

And don’t fall into this trap: No matter how hard you try, you can’t have the perspective of an outsider. Come up with a few objectives for your ideal website visitor, have some real outsiders try to accomplish them, and watch and listen to what they are going through. It can be quite revealing and the insight can be helpful to getting the results you want.

 

 

B2B Marketing Plan: Steps to Implementing a Program That Drives New Business

 

Follow these steps to tune up your B2B marketing program and drive new business.

In the following article I list:

  • Goals
  • Strategy
  • Tactics
  • Sales tools
  • Metrics
  • Resources and budget
  • Implementation

It’s a quick bullet-point summary–and it’s great to have as a roadmap as you develop your marketing program. Let me know what you think.

 

 

Persona-Based Marketing: Getting Started

Persona-based marketing goes beyond simple demographic data

Persona-based marketing describes who a prospect or customer is, by also answering questions about their behavior such as: what keeps this person awake at night? How does he spend his time? How does she like to be sold to?

This concept can help you, as a business-to-business marketer, by creating a vivid, tangible picture of your best prospects or customers, and then sculpting a marketing message that’s pertinent to their concerns, and move them to inquire and buy.

How to get started:

  1. Convene a group of employees who interact with your customers and prospects. Bring in lunch and a white board and ask them to help you build a persona for each of your target customers.
  2. Start by describing the customer’s role in their company: CEO, CIO, CFO, COO, sales manager, purchasing agent, user, and any other important influencers.
  3. Next describe the kind of company they work for. What industry is it in? How big is it? How up-to-date is it? Does it have a lot of competition?
  4. Then describe the person and their behavior: Give each persona a name, a title, an age, and describe how he or she looks. How does he dress? What kind of car does she drive? What does he do in his free time? What kind of educational background does she have?
  5. Flesh out as many attributes as you need to give a full, rounded picture of who this person is. Then, turn to your persona’s problems and goals.
  6. Think about what does this person’s daily calendar look like? What are his or her most pressing concerns? What product or service attributes would be most helpful in solving this person’s problems? Is he or she looking to roll up 20 databases into one, getting ready for an IPO, dealing with a new competitor who has just entered the market?
  7. Then, when formulating your marketing messages, think about what path this prospect or customer might pursue to solve this problem. Will he or she turn to white papers or articles in trade publications or Web sites? Would this customer or prospect seek input from a speaker at a networking group of their peers? Let the personas steer the route, which you can pave with information that can help your prospect and customers move forward in their consideration and buying process.

Read the full article at my website: Persona-based marketing: Powerful tools for connecting with prospects and customers

 

4 great solutions for a marketing ROI challenge

What do you do when you have a tough time quantifying marketing return on investment? Recently someone contacted me asking for advice.

A Marketing ROI Challenge

The challenge I face is that we sell 98% of our products through one and two step distribution. As a result:

  1. Even if my sales guys follow up the lead, it’s being referred to one of our distributors,
  2. We don’t know if the prospect ever visits the distributor, much less buys from him,
  3. Our distributor doesn’t share sales or customer data, because they’re afraid that we’ll ‘poach’ the customer,
  4. If you ask the sales team how much the advertising drove the sale, they (obviously) tell me that while it was helpful — they were the key variable in closing the sale.

We track all of our marketing expenditures and leads, so we have a good sense of what each lead generation source costs us. But I can’t close the loop on an ROI. Any thoughts on how we might approach quantifying it?

4 Marketing ROI Solutions

  1. Conduct “Did you buy?” surveys (by mail, e-mail or phone) to the leads to determine what sales resulted and why or why not.
  2. Compare warranty cards or registrations to leads. Incentivize the returning of warranty cards with hats, t-shirts, etc.
  3. Incentivize the distributor salespeople to report back on closed sales by offering spiffs, bonuses, etc.
  4. Give the lead a “coupon” they can redeem at purchase for a discount or upgrade or add-on. The distributor has to turn it in to get reimbursed, closing the loop.

Marketing Lead Calculator

I’ve also developed a spreadsheet you can download and use to calculate marketing return on investment:

 
Need help with B2B lead generation, marketing and sales?
For more information, please call Mac McIntosh at +1-401-294-7730, send him email at or visit www.sales-lead-experts.com